Hookedblog finally found some time to head over East to Hackney Wick to look for the works of Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. We had heard the artist was briefly back in London working on a number of projects – including a joint exhibition at Creative Debut with London artist Hin, as well as a new print edition with East London gallery Nelly Duff.

While in town Delgado also returned to the streets and managed to install a new series of his much loved miniature street art paste-ups.

These street-level paper works are no more than a few inches in height, wheat-pasted to the walls at pavement level more often than not with hand painted shadows or as in the case of this new series pictured below, splashes of vibrant colour along with the painted shadows adding to the 3D effect. We had read on Instagram that Delgado installed around 25 pieces around Hackney Wick. 

Looking at the artists Instagram account and the dates when he shared some of the pieces he installed we were not sure if we would find still find any of his paper works surviving after a few weeks of exposure to the weather elements. Plus with none of the images shared on Instagram tagged with the locations or street names we were not sure how many if any we would be able to locate. 

Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

Hunting for Pablo Delgado

For our afternoon of street art hunting in Hackney Wick, we took the No 8 bus from Shoreditch and figuring we would start on the Fish Island side of Hackney Wick. With the winter light fading early in the afternoon we headed over around noon as we wanted to give ourselves enough time to locate as many of the works as possible.

Our hunt for the Delgado works was made that little bit easier having previous photographed some of the artists street projects such as his missing woman series and some of his miniature street scenes we had a pretty good idea of what to be on the lookout for.

No sooner had we descended the stairs at the Greenway down onto Dace Road and we spotted the first of Delgado’s works in our hunt, instantly recognizing the miniature discovery as that of Delgado. With the first one located we knew we were on the trail and soon found a second and third further along Dace Road. The rest of our afternoon involved a lot of walking the streets of Fish Island in efforts to discover the 25 or so works. Our search was not helped by the falling Winter temperatures and there were multiple coffees breaks at Stour Space over the course of the day.
Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog
With the winter light fading and making picture taking difficulty, we finished our hunt for Delgado’s work and we were happy to have discovered 10 of the artists miniature street scenes. Most of what we found was still in pretty good condition, one of two you will see from the pictures below had not survived the British winter weather and the paper works had begun to break down.

Our hunt is not over yet as we know there are still more to be discovered and we plan to re-visit Hackney Wick soon in efforts to locate more if any of our readers have tips on the pieces we missed out on please let us know in the comments section. 

Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

A wider shot of the piece above to give you an idea of the scale of these Delgado pieces.

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Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

Some pieces such as the one above have now survived the British Winter so well and parts of the paper works had already begun to disintegrate when we got around to photographing it.


Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

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Miniature Street Art in London, by Mexican street artist Pablo Delgado. Photo ©Mark Rigney / Hookedblog

“There are times to be casual and times to be correct,” couturier Elsa Schiaparelli is alleged to have once said. “It’s alright to wear a sweater and slacks on a picnic, but they don’t belong in the theatre or the drawing room.” What Mme Schiaparelli didn’t comment on, however, was the etiquette of bringing the theatre or drawing room to the picnic. Because whether she would have liked it or not, there are few things more pleasurable than dressing up to the nines to only to lounge around in a park on a summer’s afternoon doing absolutely nothing but sipping on lukewarm fizzy wine from flimsy plastic tumblers. Here, photographer Sam Khoury and stylist Molly Shillingford present an edit of summer clothing tailor-made for doing just that.

1. Casual corsetry (above)

This Vivienne Westwood draped lace dress with a built-in corset is the best of comfort and constriction wrapped up in one garment.  

2. Velvet and velour

Lounge-wear meets sumptuous fabrications in Chopova Lowena’s velvet pinafore dress and Maxine Beiny’s velour leggings. 

3. Balloon sleeves

Ballooning sleeves, as seen in Chopova Lowena’s lace shirt, allude to the frou-frou codes of regency dress. But are, in fact, supremely easy to wear. 

4. Camp out in crystals

Dsquared2’s crystal earrings inject a dose of glitz into Kitty Garratt’s sleeping bag-style bomber jacket. 

5. Slip-on Chanel

These PVC and denim mules by Chanel are perfect for nonchalantly kicking on and off, but inherently elegant all the same. 

6. Wall hanging-inspired outerwear

Simone Rocha’s floral tapestry coat would look equally as good displayed on a wall as it would slung over your shoulders on a chilly evening. 

7. Picnic-blanket shirting 

Similarly, Ottolinger’s red gingham shirt is an elevated take on the alfresco tablecloth. 


I was contacted a while back to create a cover for an upcoming novel by Mike Resnick, titled ‘The Master of Dreams’. I have done some covers for Mike Resnick before, so I was already familiar with his writing, which is always full of adventure, and little bit of camp, and lots of magic. All the ingredients for a really cool cover.

The story revolves around the protagonist, Raven, who keeps hopping through alternate realities, and doesn’t know why. These realities appear to fanciful depictions of storybook worlds, and in each reality he takes on a different persona fitting for that world. Be it the Wizard of Oz, A Humphrey Bogart film, or Camelot, he is always thrust into an adventure and keeps encountering the same people (albeit in different forms) as he tries to figure out why this is happening to him.

The novel begins with Raven taking his girlfriend to get a Tarot reading. The cards hold a lot of significance in the story, and I thought they would be a great vehicle by which to sell the magical narrative of the book. So most of my concept sketches began with the cards as a jumping off point.

I also wanted to play with the idea of his reality being a bit fluid, and capture the sense of a storybook land. So I tried to make the background look like a stage set for a play… something that is not quite real, and ever-changing. I also felt that by making that stage set crumble away, I could use some interesting textures that matched the often gritty texture of the story.

The client settled on sketch #1, and I was then tasked with refining the image to a finish, which I typically do with the help of photographic reference. Up until this point, I’d been sketching purely from imagination so that I don’t get too restricted by ‘accuracy’ when I’m trying to be creative.

I went ahead and hired a model through a website called www.modelmayhem.com, and was lucky to find a local model that a had a look quite similar to what I needed. I shared my sketch with him in advance so he could arrive in clothing that matched the sketch as close as possible… which was surprisingly accurate. I set up a simple backdrop in my garage, and took as many photos as I needed to help facilitate a more accurate final drawing. In addition to the whole pose, I also take lots of detail shots of things like faces, hands and props that I can later mix and match to suit my needs. I also shot some of the poses from the unused sketches, just in case. The model did a sensational job capturing the poses I was going for, and made my job so much easier!

With reference in hand, I then begin redrawing my concept directly onto my painting surface, which in this case was primed illustration board, approximately 16×20 inches in size.

I knew the tarot cards were going to be a particularly difficult task to paint, as fine line work is really challenging in oil paint, especially at such a small scale. Because of this, I decided to “draw” the cards as finely detailed as I could in ink first, and then just wash transparent color over them so as to preserve the drawing and details. In order to do this, I first drew the cards in real life, at actual size. Rather than just photographing real tarot cards, I wanted to draw them because I wanted to modify the Major Arcana cards to match the story. The ‘Lion’ card could be the Lion from the Wizard of Oz, the ‘Hermit’ card could be Humphrey Bogart, and Merlin could be the ‘Magician’ card, etc.

I scanned my drawings and distorted them in Photoshop to match my sketch. I then printed them out on a Laser Printer and used a commonly know trick called an ‘Acetone Transfer’ to transfer this drawing directly to my board without the need of re-drawing them, which would be really tedious and really difficult to do in such an extreme perspective. The transfers never come out flawlessly, so they take a little fine tuning to refine them, but that’s a simple task by comparison. You can read more about the transfer process here: http://www.muddycolors.com/2018/09/how-to-do-acetone-transfers/

With the tarot cards transferred, my underdrawing is complete. I can then seal the drawing with a workable spray fixative to avoid smudging, and begin the long process of oil painting the image.